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LITERARY LUMINARIES REVIEW​​
Arlen's Gun Reviews
The Age Of The Individual

Below are ratings (on a scale of 1 to 5) and general descriptions of the main sections of your book, followed by a review. Even though this is only a Mini-Critique, we hope it will help you understand how readers could perceive the various elements of your book.

Appearancce:

The appearance of a book can make a significant impact on the experience of a reader, whose enjoyment is often enhanced by an enticing cover, an intriguing table of contents, interesting chapter headings, and when possible, eye-catching illustrations.

Plot:

The characters of a book should be well defined with strengths and flaws, and while they do not have to be likable, the reader does have to be able to form a connection with them. The tone should be consistent, the theme should be clear, and the plot should be original or told from a unique perspective. For informative books -- those without plot and characters--this rating refers primarily to your concept and how well you presented it.

Development:

Development refers to how effectively you told your story or discussed your topic. The dialogue should be realistic, the descriptions should be vivid, and the material should be concise and coherent. Organization is also a key factor, especially for informative books -- those without plot and characters. The order in which you tell your story or explain your topic and how smoothly it flows can have a huge impact on the reader's understanding and enjoyment of the material.

Formatting:

Formatting is the single most overlooked area by authors. The way in which you describe scenes, display dialogue, and shift point of view can make or break your story. In addition, excessive grammatical errors and typos can give your book an amateurish feel and even put off readers completely.

Marketability:

Marketability refers to how effectively you wrote your book for your target audience. Authors may include content that is above or below the understanding of their target reader, or include concepts, opinions or language that can accidentally confuse or alienate some readers. Although by its nature this rating is very subjective, a very low rating here and poor reviews may indicate an issue with your book in this area.

Overall Opinion:

The overall starred rating takes into account all these elements and describes the overall reading experience of your reviewer. This is the official Readers' Favorite review rating for your book.

Reviewed by : K.C Finn
Title: The Age of the Individual and My Life and Times in It

Subtitle: C'est La Vie!
Author: Frank Veszely
Genre: No
n-Fiction - Memoir

 

Ratings:

Appearance: 5

Plot: 5

Development: 5

Formatting: 5

Marketability: 5

Overall Opinion: 5

The Age of the Individual and My Life and Times in It: C'est La Vie! is a work of non-fiction in the memoir, life philosophy, and inspirational writing subgenres. It is best suited to the general adult reading audience. Penned by author Frank Veszely, this engaging, varied, and honestly penned work is a poignant exploration of a life shaped by immigration, health challenges, and the tumultuous historical backdrop of the Iron Curtain. The book invites readers into a deeply personal journey, providing insights into the author's resilience, survival, and belief in oneself. It doesn't just narrate a unique life but intertwines it with broader themes of democracy, perseverance, and the human experience, offering wider perspectives on how we view life that will help anyone make sense of their own situation. 

 

Author Frank Veszely has crafted a deeply emotionally charged reading experience that will surprise readers again and again with its hidden depths. One of the things I liked most about the narrative style was its effortless ability to capture the essence of vulnerability yet also show the grit and bravery of survival. This core focus on the search for meaning in the face of adversity is a driving force of the work, and it’s clear that Veszely is a man who lives by his word. The blend of personal anecdotes and reflections on larger societal issues creates a compelling narrative that is sure to resonate with readers on a profound level. I found myself shifting between the interesting historical context and social effects of the author’s experiences and then reflecting on my own upbringing and its effects on me. This kind of honest, open narrative is a skill in itself and a testament to the strength of the human spirit. Overall, for an essential reminder that, in our shared vulnerabilities, we find connections that transcend individual stories, I would not hesitate to recommend The Age of the Individual and My Life and Times in It: C'est La Vie!

Reviewed by : Grant Leishman
Title: The Age of the Individual and My Life and Times in It

Subtitle: C'est La Vie!
Author: Frank Veszely
Genre: No
n-Fiction - Memoir

 

Ratings:

Appearance: 4

Plot: 5

Development: 5

Formatting: 5

Marketability: 5

Overall Opinion: 5

The Age of the Individual and My Life and Times in It: C’est La Vie by Frank Veszely is an incredible story of courage, adaptability, and one immigrant’s struggle to assimilate into a culture and language foreign to him. Frank Veszely was just a young man in 1956 when the ordinary people of Hungary had finally had enough of Soviet and communist domination and rose up against their oppressors. The author was deeply involved in the revolution and was forced to flee Hungary, facing almost certain execution for treason. Making his way to the Canadian Embassy in Austria, he was granted emigration to Canada where he was sent into the frozen wastes of the Arctic, along with hundreds of other refugees, to work for low wages on forestry projects in the cold, unforgiving land. Learning English and adapting to Canadian culture, he eventually managed to educate himself, meet and marry a Canadian girl, and find a position teaching; a career in which he spent the rest of his life. We follow Frank through every facet of his ordinary, yet incredible life, as well as explore aspects of culture, language, politics, and philosophy.

 

The Age of the Individual and My Life and Times in It is much more than just a simple autobiography of a brave and committed immigrant finding his feet in a new and strange land. Author Frank Veszely is a great thinker, a fantastic poet, and a genuinely warm and caring individual. His poems, which are sprinkled liberally throughout the narrative are some of the greatest highlights of this memoir, and the poem he dedicated to his late wife is deeply moving and beautifully constructed. What the author seeks to do in this work is to raise issues, especially those facing immigrants in general and Canadians in particular. Whilst, as a reader, I may not always agree with the author’s political viewpoints and suggestions for improvement, I was genuinely impressed by the rationality of his arguments and the passion with which he postulated them. I particularly appreciated the recounting of the Hungarian revolt against Soviet oppression and understood completely his abhorrence of communism but also his willingness to accept that socialism had a place within the structure of Western society, as evidenced by the author’s demands for improvements in Canada’s public education and health systems. Similarly, his commitment as an educator to the public system was commendable, especially in the face of the ever-increasing demands being placed on teachers in recent decades. This memoir also includes a fascinating biography of another extremely successful Hungarian refugee, whom the author saw as his mentor; John Miska. Although this book is a significant read, the depth and breadth of Veszely’s life, thoughts, and recollections deserve a tome of this magnitude and I read it voraciously. What this story does is make the reader think and that is a quality to be lauded. I can highly recommend this read.

Reviewed by : Foluso Falaye
Title: The Age of the Individual and My Life and Times in It

Subtitle: C'est La Vie!
Author: Frank Veszely
Genre: No
n-Fiction - Memoir

 

Ratings:

Appearance: 5

Plot: 5

Development: 4

Formatting: 5

Marketability: 4

Overall Opinion: 5

In The Age of the Individual and My Life and Times in It, Frank Veszely shares his views on politics, social issues, art, and his experience as a Hungarian who migrated to Canada. He recounts his narrow escape from peril during the Hungarian Revolution and his recollection of the oppressive government of Stalinism. Furthermore, Frank's view on capitalism and the USA sheds light on the hypocrisy of freedom and the American dream. The book draws the reader's attention to how Canada is heavily influenced by the USA and the impact of foreign investment on the economy. Veszely also explores his struggles with heart disease and caring for his daughter after a serious road accident. Additionally, he shares his passion for poetry, his poems, and his opinions on the works of other creators, including author Miska Janos and poet Alexander Forbes.

 

Reading this book is like reading several books in one. It's such a nuanced and profoundly captivating book that I hope to read it multiple times in the future. Frank Veszely's words are often lyrical and filled with highly enlightening observations that have the reader lost in thought and deeply immersed in a new perspective. I saw the flaw in capitalism while reading his observation of the high rate of imprisonment per capita in the USA compared to Russia and China. The book offers a candid, balanced political examination, which reflects the author's personal experience of both capitalism and communism. From excellent poetry to a comprehensive historical lesson and thought-provoking philosophical ideas, the reader is engaged throughout Frank's tightly packed masterpiece. You will love The Age of the Individual and My Life and Times in It if you enjoy books about history, politics, and poetry.

LITERARY LUMINARIES REVIEW​​
Arlen's Gun Reviews
Hungarian Poetry

Below are ratings (on a scale of 1 to 5) and general descriptions of the main sections of your book, followed by a review. Even though this is only a Mini-Critique, we hope it will help you understand how readers could perceive the various elements of your book.

Appearancce:

The appearance of a book can make a significant impact on the experience of a reader, whose enjoyment is often enhanced by an enticing cover, an intriguing table of contents, interesting chapter headings, and when possible, eye-catching illustrations.

Plot:

The characters of a book should be well defined with strengths and flaws, and while they do not have to be likable, the reader does have to be able to form a connection with them. The tone should be consistent, the theme should be clear, and the plot should be original or told from a unique perspective. For informative books -- those without plot and characters--this rating refers primarily to your concept and how well you presented it.

Development:

Development refers to how effectively you told your story or discussed your topic. The dialogue should be realistic, the descriptions should be vivid, and the material should be concise and coherent. Organization is also a key factor, especially for informative books -- those without plot and characters. The order in which you tell your story or explain your topic and how smoothly it flows can have a huge impact on the reader's understanding and enjoyment of the material.

Formatting:

Formatting is the single most overlooked area by authors. The way in which you describe scenes, display dialogue, and shift point of view can make or break your story. In addition, excessive grammatical errors and typos can give your book an amateurish feel and even put off readers completely.

Marketability:

Marketability refers to how effectively you wrote your book for your target audience. Authors may include content that is above or below the understanding of their target reader, or include concepts, opinions or language that can accidentally confuse or alienate some readers. Although by its nature this rating is very subjective, a very low rating here and poor reviews may indicate an issue with your book in this area.

Overall Opinion:

The overall starred rating takes into account all these elements and describes the overall reading experience of your reviewer. This is the official Readers' Favorite review rating for your book.

Reviewed by : K.C. Finn

Title: Hungarian Poetry

Subtitle: Folk, Classical and Modern in English 1000 years
Author: Frank Veszely
Genre:
Fiction - Poetry - General

 

Ratings:

Appearance: 5

Plot: 5

Development: 5

Formatting: 5

Marketability: 5

Overall Opinion: 5

Hungarian Poetry: Folk, Classical and Modern in English 1000 Years is a collected work of poetry translations and interpretations intended to preserve the traditional style. Authored by poet Frank Veszely, this masterful collection spans a millennium of Hungarian poetic expression. Veszely is both an accomplished poet and literary historian, and he presents a treasure trove of translations that are not mere transcriptions. These works aim to capture the same spirit, form, rhythm, and rhyme patterns as the originals, preserving the essence of each traditional poet's work.

Author Frank Veszely has created a brilliantly engaging collection of poetry that allows his readers to embark on a journey through Hungary's cultural evolution in very safe hands indeed. The poems resonate with a profound love for freedom, providing a window into the nation's identity, history, and ideology across the centuries.

Veszely's translations are a linguistic marvel, making the poems feel as if they were composed in English in the first place; so natural are the arrangements and the way that the rhythm and cadence of each piece fall into line. As a huge fan of poetry in general, it is always a wonderful experience to find a collection from another culture that you feel you can understand fully despite it having been translated for you. The collection is a testament to the enduring power of poetic words and verses, transcending time and language, offering readers a rich and immersive experience of Hungary's literary heritage. Overall, Hungarian Poetry serves as both a celebration and an educational exploration, making this very special part of the poetry world accessible and enchanting for English-speaking audiences. 

Reviewed by : Courtnee Turner Hoyle

Title: Hungarian Poetry

Subtitle: Folk, Classical and Modern in English 1000 years
Author: Frank Veszely
Genre:
Fiction - Poetry - General

 

Ratings:

Appearance: 5

Plot: 5

Development: 5

Formatting: 5

Marketability: 5

Overall Opinion: 5

Working for over twenty years, Frank Veszely has translated many Hungarian poems from early folk origins to 2021 in his book, Hungarian Poetry. Placing one thousand years of Hungarian poetry in one book, Veszely breaks this work down into four parts, reviving early folk poetry and songs, military pieces, 1800s poetry, and ending with contemporary selections. Short biographies of many of the poets precede pieces with themes of nature, progression, patriotism, and struggle, and the author encourages live performances of the musical selections. Veszely weaves a history lesson in the text, giving a background for the poetry at the beginning of each section and providing pictures of many of the authors.

Fueled by the power of deep meaning, Frank Veszely translates poems of love, loss, luck, and hardship, and reveals customs, traditions, and preparations for war alongside fascinating stories that will entertain readers. Even though he translated them into English, Veszely took great care to preserve the rhyme and rhythm of the folk pieces. The author included some of his work, illustrating his views as a Hungarian-Canadian who was raised during intense periods of war. The poems are easy to read and appreciate with a modern understanding, and I could comprehend the meaning of the folk poems and songs. The author captures the soul of Hungarian poetry as he translates it, and he gives readers a history of the Magyar language and some difficulties he faced while translating.

Hungarian Poetry is a good selection for Hungarian immigrants, and interested scholars and readers.

Reviewed by : C.R. Hurst

Title: Hungarian Poetry

Subtitle: Folk, Classical and Modern in English 1000 years
Author: Frank Veszely
Genre:
Fiction - Poetry - General

 

Ratings:

Appearance: 5

Plot: 5

Development: 5

Formatting: 5

Marketability: 5

Overall Opinion: 5

Hungarian Poetry: Folk, Classical and Modern in English 1000 Years is a project of passion for poet and translator, Frank Veszely. In it, he celebrates a thousand years of Hungarian culture through its poetry by translating selected folk, classical, and modern poems from Hungarian to English. Through these poems, the reader encounters the indomitable spirit of the Hungarian people who have endured ceaseless wars and invasions, yet still possess a love of country while striving for freedom that remains elusive. The poems capture the mixed emotions of those Hungarians who have fled their homeland to migrate to more peaceful countries such as Canada so that their children might pursue happier and more productive lives – yet the love of the old country still beats in their hearts.


I found Frank Veszely’s translations profoundly affecting, though I am not of Hungarian descent, nor do I speak Hungarian. Somehow the poems Veszely has translated in Hungarian Poetry manage to speak to me in universal ways. I have not encountered war or autocratic rule, but I have encountered enough personal loss to understand, through these poems, the anger and frustrations of a people who have found power and freedom only in words.


Moreover, the translations produce a song-like quality that further adds to their impact. It is as if the translations offer laments across a thousand years – prayers asking for an understanding of a country that, even to this day, struggles with the rights and liberties that so many of us take for granted.

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